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Architecture and Interior Design: An Integrated History to the Present First EditionChapter 35 Stick, Queen Anne 1880s – 1910sCopyright © 2012 Pearson

Architecture and Interior Design: An Integrated History to the Present

First Edition

Chapter 35

Stick, Queen Anne

1880s – 1910s

Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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1

Stick, Queen Anne

Stick Style architecture combines medieval half-timbered buildings with new balloon framing construction method

Wooden planks or sticks form decorative surface patterns

Uniquely American

Does not have corresponding interior or furniture style

Queen Anne originates in England, attempt to create an image of home, tradition, & middle-class comfort

Combines elements from the 16th, 17th, & 18th centuries

Americans translate it into wood

Does not have corresponding interior or furniture style

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2

Concepts

Stick Style influenced by the Picturesque, historicism, Gothic Revival theory

Models: English picturesque suburban architecture; late Gothic vernacular in England, France & Germany; Swiss chalets; board & batten cottages of A. J. Davis & A. J Downing

English Queen Anne: no strong conceptual basis

Eclectic: elements from English vernacular, Elizabethan, Tudor; Japanese; 17th & early 18th centuries

1890s Queen Anne applied to anything not Gothic Revival

American Queen Anne: English Queen Anne image of home & ancestry appealing

Victorian vernacular: common or folk version of the style

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3

35.1

Architectural and Interior Details: Stained glass window and doorway screen, 1870s-1880s; Texas.

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Architecture

Stick Style: emerges on U. S. East Coast during the 1850s

More popular in pattern books than practice

Definitive characteristic: stickwork or flat boards in geometric patterns in panels; around windows & doors, roof brackets; porch supports

English Queen Anne, interest in Stuart & Georgian periods, rejection of morality of Gothic

18th century: red brick, sash windows, & shutters; 17th century: gables, pediments, white trim, & prominent coves; English vernacular: half-timbering, pargework, overhangs, casement windows; irregularity

American Queen Anne first architect designed; later builder style

Opening planning; variety in form, materials, textures, windows, roofs; towers; prominent chimneys

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5

35.2

New Jersey State Building, International Centennial Exhibition, 1876; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Stick Style.

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35.3

Allied Assurance Company, 1–2 St. James Street, c. 1882; Pall Mall, London, England; Richard Norman Shaw. Queen Anne.

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Long Description:

The building has slender columns and a semicircular projecting porch with six double-hung windows. Pediments over windows have lintel with keystone, string course layer on every floor, corniced finely at the top, and a row of posts hides low pitched roof, emphasis on symmetrical balance. The roofline has large curved windows.

7

35.4

Hotel del Coronado, 1886–1888; Coronado California. Queen Anne.

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Long Description:

The hotel has the creation of a spectacular five-story castle-like structure replete with Queen Anne-style design aesthetics. On the ocean, the corner is a pavilion, northward along the ocean, and terraced grass on the beach. The dining wing projects at an angle from the corner of the court and be almost detached to give total value to the view of the ocean, bay, and city.

8

35.5a

John N. A. Griswold House, 1862–1864; Newport, Rhode Island; Richard Morris Hunt. Stick Style.

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Long Description:

The building has three floors. It has three steeply pitched in a row with chimneys on top and the second floor contains glass windows rectangular in shapes same as the second floor. The ground floor has entrance and glass windows with one entrance on the left corner, another on the left corner, and plants hanging on the roof.

9

35.5b

John N. A. Griswold House stair hall, 1862–1864; Newport, Rhode Island; Richard Morris Hunt. Stick Style.

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35.6

Leys Wood, 1866-1869; Sussex, England; Richard Norman Shaw. Queen Anne.

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35.7

Mark Twain House, c. 1874; Hartford, Connecticut; Edward Tucker Potter. Stick Style.

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35.8a

Watts Sherman House, 1874-1875; Newport, Rhode Island; Henry Hobson Richardson. Queen Anne.

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Long Description:

The house has a tall chimney and a variety of roof designs. It has a horizontal band of windows, small window panes, half timbering, and shingles accent facade. The main facade has a partial width porch for entry, a brownstone on the lower wall, and an asymmetric arrangement of the facade.

13

35.8b

Floor plan and stair hall, Watts Sherman House, 1874–1875; Newport, Rhode Island; Henry Hobson Richardson. Queen Anne.

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Long Description:

The first story has gran­ite ash­lar with higher sto­ries of brick, shin­gle, and half-timbered stucco, diamond-panel win­dows grouped in long, hor­i­zon­tal bands, and five mas­sive red brick chim­neys. The roof is steeply gabled, with a broad sin­gle gable in front and mul­ti­ple sharp to the rear, all orig­i­nally shin­gled in wood.

14

35.9

Carson House, 1884–1886; Eureka, California; Samuel Newsom and Joseph C. Newsom. Queen Anne or Eastlake.

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Long Description:

The house has an asymmetrical facade, dominant, overhanging eaves, and geometrical towers. It has dutch gables, including the primary entrance area, a second-story porch, or balconies. It has pedimented porches and differing wall textures, such as patterned wood shingles shaped into varying designs, including resembling fish scales, terra cotta tiles, relief panels, or wooden shingles over brickwork, and horizontal bands of leaded windows.

15

35.10

Eldridge Johnson House (The Pink House), 1892; Cape May, New Jersey. Victorian Vernacular.

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Interiors

Stick Style: no corresponding interior style

Some have stickwork; others fashionable revivals

Queen Anne house interiors do not replicate 18th century

Revival styles, Aesthetic or Arts & Crafts Movements

Particularly in England,18th century characteristics: classical columns; pediments; low relief plasterwork; classical motifs; wall paneling

Common practice: each room a different style

Masculine styles for dining rooms & halls; feminine ones in parlors & morning rooms

Newly introduced living halls used as living rooms, entrance halls; circulation spaces

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17

35.12

Dining room, published in Decoration and Furniture of Town Houses, 1881; by Robert William Edis. London and New York City. Queen Anne.

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35.13

Parlor, Davis House, 1890s; Richmond, Texas. Victorian Vernacular.

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35.14

Mantel, late

century; United States. Queen Anne.

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35.15

Wall designs and color schemes; published in Painting and Decorating, c. 1898; by Walter Pierce, London.

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